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Publicēts: 10.02.2009.
Valoda: Angļu
Līmenis: Augstskolas
Literatūras saraksts: 16 vienības
Atsauces: Ir
Nr. Sadaļas nosaukums  Lpp.
  Introduction    3
  Jacobean era    4
  John Donne    8
  Works    11
  Love in J. Donne’s poetry    13
  Love theme in A Valediction: forbidding Mourning    13
  Love theme in The Flea    15
  Love theme in The Broken Heart    17
  Conclusion    19
  References    20
Darba fragmentsAizvērt

John Donne was a Jacobean poet and preacher, representative of the metaphysical poets of the period. The Jacobean Era refers to the period of time in which James I ruled England and Scotland, from 1603-1625. The word Jacobean comes from the Hebrew name Jacob, from which the name James is derived. Following the illustrious reign of Queen Elizabeth I, this 22-year period is remarkable for its advances in literature and philosophy, and its dramatic changes to the nation as a result of imperialism. James presided over a volatile time in British history, and the country emerged from his reign a changed nation.
J. Donne’s works are notable for their realistic and sensual style and include sonnets, love poetry, religious poems, Latin translations, epigrams, elegies, songs, satires and sermons. His poetry is noted for its vibrancy of language and inventiveness of metaphor, compared with that of his contemporaries. He is famous for his Holy Sonnets.
John Donne is considered a master of the metaphysical conceit, an extended metaphor that combines two vastly unlike ideas into a single idea, often using imagery. Unlike the conceits found in other Elizabethan poetry, most notably Petrarchan conceits, which formed clichéd comparisons between more closely related objects (such as a rose and love), metaphysical conceits go to a greater depth in comparing two completely unlike objects, although sometimes in the mode of Shakespeare's radical paradoxes and imploded contraries.
Donne's works are also witty, employing paradoxes, puns, and subtle yet remarkable analogies. His pieces are often ironic and cynical, especially regarding love and human motives. Common subjects of Donne's poems are love (especially in his early life), death (especially after his wife's death), and religion.
J. Donne came from a Roman Catholic family, and so he experienced persecution until his conversion to the Anglican Church. Despite his great education and poetic talents, he lived in poverty for several years, relying heavily on wealthy friends. In 1615 he became an Anglican priest and in 1621 Dean of St. Paul’s. Some scholars believe his literary works reflect these trends, with love poetry and satires from his youth, and religious sermons during his later years. Other scholars, such as Helen Gardner, question the validity of dating when most of his poems were published posthumously (1633). The exception to these is his Anniversaries which were published in 1612 and Devotions upon Emergent Occasions published in 1623. His sermons are also dated, sometimes quite specifically, by date and year.

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